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  1. #1
    Amie's Avatar
    Amie is offline Mac Convert for Life
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    Enabling Stealth Mode - Pros/Cons?

    A few questions:

    1. Is there any good reason to enable Stealth Mode?

    2. Why doesn't Apple have Stealth Mode set by default?

    3. Are there any drawbacks to enabling this feature?
    RIP iBook G4. You were the best computer for 8 years and you never failed at ANYTHING. I am the proud new owner of a MacBook Air. Do NOT be fooled by its sleek, super lightweight design. It's a POWERFULLY AWESOME lil' machine.

  2. #2
    DeltaMac is offline Tech
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    For the benefit of others who might view this thread:
    If you’re concerned about security, you can use the stealth mode in Mac OS X to make it more difficult for attackers to find your computer. When stealth mode is enabled, your computer will not respond to “ping” requests and does not answer to connection attempts from a closed TCP or UDP.
    So
    1.Yes, if you want to have that form of security on your OS X system. Your network connection is supposedly more secure if no one from outside easily knows that your connection exists.
    2. You should ask Apple about that, but not everyone needs to prevent others from pinging their computer. It would make it more difficult to troubleshoot certain types of network problems, I suppose.
    3. Are you asking if that interferes somehow with your internet connection? Sure - it prevents a response by your system if someone from outside pings your IP address.

    So, does that affect your internet performance (is that your real question, after all?)
    Maybe someone else has tested for any speed differences, and will chime in here...
    Bottom line for me - if you have a need for stealth mode, then turn it on....
    Serendipity is a lucky guess !

  3. #3
    Satcomer's Avatar
    Satcomer is offline In Geostationary Orbit
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amie View Post
    A few questions:

    1. Is there any good reason to enable Stealth Mode?

    2. Why doesn't Apple have Stealth Mode set by default?

    3. Are there any drawbacks to enabling this feature?
    1. To hide yourself from casual scanning users from finding your Mac on a network.

    2. Because most users want to share files on a network, especially in Active or Open Directories.

    3. You can hide from most casual users on the local network.


    Now when i get onto strange PUBLIC WiFi I use the simple NoobProof because it use the built-in command line ipfw and really hides my Intel Mac Book Pro from prying eyes. This ipfw has been refined for over thirty years so it is really robust.
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  5. #4
    Amie's Avatar
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    Hi, and thank you for the replies!

    Satcomer, may I ask you a few questions regarding what you said?

    1. To hide yourself from casual scanning users from finding your Mac on a network.
    Why would anyone want to find someone else's Mac on a network? What's the purpose of that?

    2. Because most users want to share files on a network, especially in Active or Open Directories.
    What are Active or Open Directories?

    3. You can hide from most casual users on the local network.
    Again, I don't understand this. You mean like "snooping"? If so, why snoop? Are you talking about like neighbors trying to get on my wi-fi for free?

    Sorry for all the questions. Not sure I understand.
    RIP iBook G4. You were the best computer for 8 years and you never failed at ANYTHING. I am the proud new owner of a MacBook Air. Do NOT be fooled by its sleek, super lightweight design. It's a POWERFULLY AWESOME lil' machine.

  6. #5
    Satcomer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amie View Post
    Hi, and thank you for the replies!

    Satcomer, may I ask you a few questions regarding what you said?


    Why would anyone want to find someone else's Mac on a network? What's the purpose of that?
    To share files with that user. Think Airdrop, Bonjour, etc. in local sharing.


    What are Active or Open Directories?
    They are server domain protocols in server software. Microsoft servers use Active Directory. OS X lion server (& 10.6 & 10.5) have Active Directory and Open Directory (an Open Source version of a directory).

    Most of the time Directories are in large company, college, armed services and are way overkill for the home network.


    Again, I don't understand this. You mean like "snooping"? If so, why snoop? Are you talking about like neighbors trying to get on my wi-fi for free?
    Looking for computers(people)to break into on the network, over the internet . Think targets of opportunity.

    Sorry for all the questions. Not sure I understand.[/QUOTE]

    You understand networking if you ever sent a letter through snail mail. It is not as hard as you think! You just have to understand the terminology.

    The blog post Understanding Home Networking is a start.
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