10.1 and network support

sjb2016

Registered
I was wondering what all the propaganda from Apple about 10.1 being a good network neighbor really means. Can I just access Windows servers or can I also access windows file shares on the windows LAN here at shool (without a product such as DAVE). Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Sam
 

Crunchy in milk

Journey Agent
is there a website that covers this and how to do it? I go to 'cifs' but it wont see my windows machines on the network. If I use the connect/go option in the menu, and enter the address of a windows machine (after it fails to find it on its own) it tries to connect via appletalk :confused: I don't have any firewall running on the pc (disabled it before), and its only running win98.

I know the mac can 'see' the network etc since its sharing an internet connection through a linksys router using dhcp to supply each machine with an ip address automatically. On the same note, for some reason under' local network' my mac sees its self 3 times (using its unique computer name) with 3 different ip addresses (and no none of the other machines on the network are using these ip's)
 

Crunchy in milk

Journey Agent
Originally posted by AppleWatcher
O guys you really don't get it.

With Mac OS X 10.1 you can connect to Windows machines with

smb://LAN;you

AW
I tried smb://192.168.1.101;michael

no file service at this address

I tried smb://WORKGROUP;michael

no file service at this address

I tried smb://Chopper;michael

no file service at this address.

---

[EDIT]

I found a simliar thread under trouble shooting, I had removed dave donkeys ago and it left behind a file ( mount.cifs ) in the sbin folder that was preventing the os 10.1 smb from mounting my shares :(

once I deleted this, typing smb://chopper/d worked a treat, using the ' ;name ' simply adds your name in the popup login window.

Ok thats sorted, nearly up to speed again with 10.1! :) now to figure out why my mouse menu doesnt work while holding down the button, only via control + click.
 

cutter

Registered
well, i've heard of a way of connecting to windows servers that works like:

SMB://SERVERIP;WORKGROUP

and will then prompt you with a screen to login.

Hope this helps

---
Brian
 

AlanCE

Registered
we have several shared windows boxes, nothing connects using apple's movie method
 

Crunchy in milk

Journey Agent
Originally posted by AlanCE
we have several shared windows boxes, nothing connects using apple's movie method
Well after removing dave and its niggly hidden and system files manually I got mine to work. I did read on another thread here at macosx.com that there can be other issues that stop smb share mounting from working :(

--

In my example I have two pc machines and 2 macs connected via the one linksys router, which also hooks up to a cable modem.

the linksys gives out ips in the range of 192.168.1.x where x is any number, individual to each machine (this ip is just specific to the local area network). One of the pcs ip address was 192.168.1.101. Right clicking on 'network neighbourhood' on that pc's desktop and choosing properties, then going to the 'identiy' tab of the network settings box that comes up, you can see the pc's 'name' and the workgroup name. In my example, the pc's name is 'Chopper' and the workgroup is 'workgroup' (no quotes, I set these in manually when setting up the pc's on the lan)

Armed with this information, and with dave completely uninstalled, also knowing that each machine is connected properly via the linksys, I was able to connect to the pc from osX.1 with the line:

smb://workgroup;michael@chopper/d

This brought up a login box in which I could enter my password at the bottom to access 'd' on the machine 'chopper' in the workgroup 'workgroup'.

If I had wanted I could also put in the password in the connection line by typing

smb://workgroup;michael:password@chopper/d

*Make sure your pc's are set up to share files! (click the 'share my files/printer' button in the network settings dialogue box on the pc!)
**Make sure you specifiy a volume on the pc to share, do this by right clicking on a drive or folder and chosing the 'share' tab. The share tab will only appear if you have file sharing enabled on that pc. On the share tab you can set up the password and level of access for that particular drive or folder. In my example above you can see the share on the pc was a drive named 'd'.
 

fmalloy

Registered
A more basic question: how do I know if my Windows network is using SMB? Do all networks use this, or are there different protocols?
 

kevsteris

Registered
try this...first try and ping the server ip address to make sure you can connect to it..(open the terminal and type ping "space" ip of server)
ie. ping 192.168.1.1 or dns name of server

1. Find out exactly what is Folder(Directory) is being shared by the PC or server...( ex. our NT accounting server has a folder called "accounting files" that is being shared out as "acctfiles"

2. "apple*k" or go to "connect to server" under the go menu

3. type smb://server dns name or ip address/share
ex. smb://acctserver.gel.com/acctfiles
(our dns is "gel.com")
4. You will be prompted at the next screen for a workgroup, a login name and password(I assume that you already have a valid account on the windows box).

5. I skip the workgroup and just fill -in the others. (some servers.ex samba services running on unix servers require clear-text passwords so check under the options button if the above does not work.

let me know if this works ok.. no problems for me... i have mounted 5 or 6 unix servers running samba, 2 win nt servers and 1 win 2000 server.

MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT HAVE ANY OTHER 3rd party smb application installed
(ie dave, sharity etc)
 

Ripcord

Senior Lurker
fmalloy:

Windows file and printer sharing uses CIFS (also known as SMB) by default. If you go into control panel and "Client for Microsoft Networks" is installed - that's CIFS.

Windows machines can use other protocols for file/device sharing (NFS, Novell protocols, etc), but it's rare. It's a pretty safe bet that if you're talking about Windows File Sharing, you're talking about CIFS.

Ian
 
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