Airport and gNAT

davstein

Registered
Hey Y'all

Anyone have any experience using computer-to-computer Software Base Station on the Mac with a PC?

More importantly, will gNAT let me share an internet connection over an Airport computer-to-computer network? I'm trying to use a 802.11 compatible PC card in my girlfriend's Windose machine and want to wirelessly get internet from my PPPoE G4.

Thanks!

d.:(
 

WhateverJoe

echo $row['what_tha'];
all one needs is an AirPort Card, but you will still need "I think" a software package like IPNetRouter in order to share an Internet connection. If the connection is from a cable or DSL modem via NIC, then you will need to run something that will "NAT" the interfaces between your NIC and airport card. Same for laying a bridge between the modem and any other interface.....

 

avalenz

Registered
Originally posted by WhateverJoe
all one needs is an AirPort Card, but you will still need "I think" a software package like IPNetRouter in order to share an Internet connection. If the connection is from a cable or DSL modem via NIC, then you will need to run something that will "NAT" the interfaces between your NIC and airport card. Same for laying a bridge between the modem and any other interface.....

Gotcha... the article I linked to in the above post provides this functionality, I believe.

How well does a G4 function as a base station like this? Signal strength, speed, reliability, etc.
 

Dactyl

Registered
OK I don't know if this has been posted But your G4 w/ Airport Card will act as a basestation but I am still unable to get this solution to work with PC's. Any way here it is:

You'll need to get your hands dirty with a little unix. Put this into a text file and save it to your StartupItems Folder:

#!/bin/sh
/usr/sbin/natd -dynamic -interface en0
/sbin/ipfw -f flush
/sbin/ipfw add divert natd all from any to any via en0
/sbin/ipfw add pass all from any to any

I named it NATd. Make it executable:

chmod +x NATd

Now open up your Network System Panel and configure the Airport. In the Airport tab name the Perfered Network. (Ex: Mac OS X Base Station). Now click the TCP/IP Tab. Enter a fake address. Remember this is going to be the router or gateway address for your remote clients. (ex: 10.0.0.1) Next, enter the subnet mask as 255.255.255.0. Don't add anything else in the other fields. Now go to Advanced under the Configure Dropdown Menu. Make sure Airport is checked here. Ok, you are all set here. Click save.

If you run the script you created above you will not have to restart. You can also run each command separately if you want.


Now you have to configure the remote client. This first think you have to do is select the airport network. You will NOT see any signal level but don't worry. Under "Airport Network" select your network. It will be the name you just assigned. If you do not see the network name something is wrong. Check you configuration.

After the Airport network is set, open the TCP/IP control panel. select "Connect via Airport" and "Configure Manually". Assuming you used 10.0.0.1 above, set your IP settings as follows:

IP: 10.0.0.2
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Router Address: 10.0.0.1
Name server addr: GET FROM YOUR ISP

save this setting and if all goes well then when you open up Netscape, your homepage will load.

I have not done any hard testing with this yet but this setup seems faster than using OS 9 Software base station.

Hope this helps

Dactyl
 
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