Bridging two networks

mattmaher

Registered
Hi All,

I need help linking two networks. The setup is four dual powerpc G5's & two G4 powerbooks. DSL modem to Airport Extreme Base Station.

Currently all G4 & G5s are connected wirelessly and getting bad file transfer times over the LAN. We are also adding another DSL connection for a deadicated internet file transfer from only one of the G5s (submitting images to a photo lab)

So the problems I am facing is how to get better file transfer rates over the LAN.

and..

The G5 with the upcoming deadicated DSL connection, how do I still keep it on the same LAN (for internal file transfers) but tell it to use the deadicated DSL for internet access and not the one currently shared on the LAN?

BTW sorry if this is pretty simple stuff as I am quite new to macs, but know PC's backwards
 

applemaz

Registered
If some of your computers are using Airport Extreme cards and some are using the original Airport cards, you are limiting your network to a theoretical maximum of 10 megabits/sec transfer rate. You could speed up the network by taking the machines with the original Airport cards off the network. Ethernet functions on the network at the speed of the slowest card in a computer on the network.
 

ksv

web developer
If you need high transfer speeds, you should connect the computers in a wired network, and it's probably worth investing in gigabit (1000 Mbps) equipment, i.e. gigabit switch(es) and category 6 cabling.
This is especially true for servers, because wireless networks are generally unreliable and have longer response times, and because they are insecure. The wireless network should be separated from the wired network with a proper hardware firewall.

applemaz said:
If some of your computers are using Airport Extreme cards and some are using the original Airport cards, you are limiting your network to a theoretical maximum of 10 megabits/sec transfer rate. You could speed up the network by taking the machines with the original Airport cards off the network. Ethernet functions on the network at the speed of the slowest card in a computer on the network.
Not true for wireless networks and ethernet switches. Only applies to old-fashioned hubs.
 
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