Don't use telnet!

fintler

Registered
It kind of annoys me that apple still doesn't have sshd running by default. OpenSSH is installed, but it is not set up to bind to port 22 and allow connections. Instead, apple defaults to the most insecure 1980's way of connecting to a computer with telnetd...get a clue apple...sshd compiled fine for me, what's stoping you from including it with a beta?
 

MeanGoat

Registered
I agree with hekal. Get a clue fintler... though you're probably happy that sendmail isn't enabled right? Probably upset that there isn't a default set of firewall rules? Probably don't like a Unix that you have to configure? BTW, telnetd is not on by default on my box. So if I wanted to configure remote access to my machine, then I would have to turn something on wouldn't I? Hmmmm, which do I pick? I have telnetd and sshd both installed.... hmmmm....
 

hekal

Registered
Yup.. telnetd is off by default, so is ftp. Unix forces you to open itself up to the outside world. It's SUPPOSED to be a secure system.
 

SvMp

Registered
You're right...SSH is much better, telnet is old. SSH is secure telnet isn't.

You said sshd compiled fine. But how do you install it manually? Did you manage to get ssh running with your OS X box? It would be very nice when this is possible, so I can safely use my Darwin terminal from school.
 

hekal

Registered
i never said compiled. i sid its in the system by default.

just enable it.
 

joseph

Registered
So how do you enable it? My friend and i tried it this weekend and we couldn't get it to generate a host key, apparently it has to do that upon install.

 

joseph

Registered
I realize that the hostconfig file is a simple text file that I can open in Textedit, but exactly what do i add?

What is the excat syntax and wording?
 

joseph

Registered
There are no man pages on hostconfig. If there is someone out there who can help me please do.

All i need to know is exactly what to add to my hostconfig file here is an example of my file:

##
# /etc/hostconfig
##
# This file in maintained by the system control panels
##

# Network configuration
HOSTNAME=-AUTOMATIC-
ROUTER=-AUTOMATIC-

# Services
AFPSERVER=-NO-
APPLETALK=-NO-
AUTHSERVER=-NO-
AUTOCONFIG=-YES-
AUTODISKMOUNT=-REMOVABLE-
AUTOMOUNT=-YES-
CONFIGSERVER=-NO-
IPFORWARDING=-NO-
MAILSERVER=-NO-
MANAGEMENTSERVER=-NO-
NETBOOTSERVER=-NO-
NISDOMAIN=-NO-
TIMESYNC=-YES-
QTSSERVER=-NO-
WEBSERVER=-NO-

What do I add?

 

MeanGoat

Registered
Reboot? That's a dirty word. It's unix man, not windows. Actually, how do you re-init runlevels? Under linux you can just change the runlevel or re-init the runlevel which is much easier and faster than rebooting. I understand we could just modify /etc/hostconfig and then execute sshd from the command line, but is there a way to reinit a BSD without rebooting?
 

joseph

Registered
I rebooted, I rebooted again and nothing changed.
Once again is there somthing I did not do, or something I need to do? Please help.

joseph
 

jwalcik

Registered
where does /etc/hostconfig look for it's startup scripts? if i wanted to start, say, ssh2 on port 22 and ssh1 on port 2222 (yes, i know openssh is installed by default and it handles both protocols, but i'm curious anyway), where would i define which one the SSHSERVER=-YES- line is actually talking about (i'm assuming this requires more than simply adding the proper entries to /etc/services)
 

qousqous

Registered
Okay, this is how I got SSHd working:

Go into the Terminal, and cd /etc
Type "su" to get root access, and enter in your password.
Type "ssh-keygen -q -f ssh_host_key", hit return, and when prompted for a passphrase, just hit return again twice to enter no passphrase. This will create an encryption key set for SSHd to use, which (silly SSHd) it won't just do on its own.

Now, you can type "sshd". You should be accessible by SSH now. I believe that you'd have to type in "sshd" every time you rebooted in order to get it running again, unless you put the "SSHSERVER=-YES-" line in your /etc/hostconfig file.

I hope this works for y'all.

Chris
 

Pascal

Official visitor
Type "ssh-keygen -q -f ssh_host_key", hit return, and when prompted for a passphrase, just hit return again twice to enter no passphrase. This will create an encryption key set for SSHd to use, which (silly SSHd) it won't just do on its own.
I have also been lost when it comes to encryption keys. Shouldn't the user know what that encryption key is ? Is that key personnal to me or to my computer ?

What would happen if I entered a passphrase ?
 
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