hiding directories from users - huh?

stone

Registered
(I know I've read some related posts rather recently, but I can't seem to find them when I search. Sorry if this duplicates something.)

I'm quite used to working with Linux and using xterms and friends. One of the REALLY nice things about os X is the possibility of actually getting under the GUI skin - as an administrator.
I can understand (but just barely) that most users might not want to see the / or the /var directories, for instance, ant that they should be protected. But I - as an administrator don't want that!

The only way of getting into these "hidden" directories, that I have found in Public Beta is to use the terminal.

I want to have a setting in Aqua which I can get to as an administrator, which effectively lets me see all directories from the "finder". It's frustrating as it is now! Perhaps this is already planned or even incorporated in more recent builds? Anybody know something?
(I felt a need to communicate this to Apple, but I discovered that they apparently removed the "Mac os X feedback" thingie on the macosx page.)

/stone
 

monty

Registered
besides logging in as root all those directories are hidden. Do you really want to see the /var, /bin, /etc, etc? As far as i'm concerned those folders (bin, sbin etc) are where CLI programs are kept so I have no problem using the Terminal to access them. All the GUI OSX apps are in the Applications folder which isn't hidden. I've only wanted to see those folders once and for that I logged on as root (yes i know It's a bad idea but I don't make a habit of it).

peter
 

BenW

Registered
They moved it, but it's still there. http://www.apple.com/macosx/beta/feedback.html

But I tend to agree that the sneaky details of Unix should only be accessible to those who are ready to deal with the sneaky details of Unix. On the other hand, if you're going to have to edit files in those hidden folders, I can see how it might be nicer to do it in TextEdit than vi or emacs.

 

griffman

Registered
Here's an easy terminal fix for the hidden file problem:

defaults write com.apple.finder ShowAllFiles True

Next time you login, you should see everything.

-rob.
 

zpincus

Registered
On the other hand, if you're going to have to edit files in those hidden folders, I can see how it might be nicer to do it in TextEdit than vi or emacs.
I'm still wary of TextEdit not getting the UNIX-style hard returns correct -- any word on this?
(Or for that matter, accidentally making an important file an RTF file! Bad news...) I use pico and emacs just to be sure what I see is what I save. But I'm not sure that TextEdit messes up -- I'm just paranoid.
Zach
 

monty

Registered
I use pico and emacs just to be sure what I see is what I save. But I'm not sure that TextEdit messes up -- I'm just paranoid.
Zach
me too. I don't think that TextEdit would really screw up the files (as long as you save as plain text) but i figure that if i'm editing the unix config files, I should use a unix text editor. I only learnt enough emacs to create new, open and edit files and quit with and without saving, which is all you really need.

peter
 

rene

Registered
BTW
i have heard that in newer builds you dont get to make
a root account anymore..just an admin account.
How can one then login as root?
To login as root you need a root password wich you do
not have, coz you can not make this account.
This way i think we dont have total freedom on our own macs!
This would be too much, i want to mess up my own system
if i choose too (LOL)
any thoughts?

rene
 

griffman

Registered
rene -

my understanding is that, by default, the root account is simply not enabled. all it takes to enable it is a quick trip to netinfo, and you have full access back.

other forums on the net have pointed out that you can't really ship a unix without a root account, so it will be there in final - it may be hidden from the 95% of the mac users who will never need it, but it will be there.

-rob.
 

scruffy

Notorious Olive Counter
Zach - I never did get to like vi or emacs. I mostly use ProjectBuilder, it saves text files in the right format by default.

For quick terminal-based editing, I use <a href="http://www.nano-editor.org">nano</a>, which has the friendliness of pico, but adds missing features like auto-indentation and search and replace.
 

endian

Dis Member
Yeah, I love Project Builder. It even has the HTML controls from HTMLEdit when you open a .html file. IMO they suck, but I hear there's gonna be a editor plugin API eventually.

(murmurs to self.. bbedit bbedit bbedit)
 

Mac Write

MacWrite.com
All I can say for edtiting unix files, is BBEdit. I use it all the time (apache.conf is the only file I play with, and I live in root) If I try to edit apache.conf from my user account, I can't. I will never use a CLI text editor.
 

griffman

Registered
MacWrite - I'm sure you've heard this before, but logging in as root is very dangerous. A much better solution to using BBedit is a program called Pseudo. This neat little drag-and-drop app will open whatever you drop on it as root. So drop BBedit on Pseudo, and edit away in relative safety, knowing you're logged in as your normal user, but you still have full editing capabilities as root.

This is how I muck around with apache.conf (except I use Alpha, not BBedit), as I'm really concerned about doing something silly if I'm logged in as root.

-rob.
 

loki

Registered
After using textedit to spruce up the dock .plist, i experienced the inabiility to boot OS X, which forced a complete reinstall. Please, for your own good use pico or others!!!
 

VGZ

Registered
Originally posted by griffman
Here's an easy terminal fix for the hidden file problem:

defaults write com.apple.finder ShowAllFiles True

Next time you login, you should see everything.

-rob.
This has changed in the final. Replace true w/ yes to get it to work now.
 

rsteed

Registered
At the root level of your OS X installation there is a file named <b>.hidden</b>, in it you will find a list of directories to be hidden to the Finder. All the traditional UNIX admin directories are found in <b>/private</b>; a well placed <b>#</b> or deleting the line will make it available through the Finder.

This is a great idea however, hiding directories that is. Especially considering that under UNIX <i>everything</i> is a file. The standard <b>/.hidden</b> file is pasted below.

Happy browsing,
Robin

<b>root# cat /.hidden
bin
cores
Desktop DB
Desktop DF
Desktop Folder
dev
etc
lost+found
mach
mach_kernel
mach.sym
#private <- A well placed # makes this available in Finder
sbin
tmp
Trash
usr
var
VM Storage
Volumes</b>
 
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