I dont care for unixes but i might not mind macosx

bond1418

Registered
Linux dosent prove to me a very usable unix. It doesnt even have proper drag and drop tell me if mac os X has a better unix.
 

iconcow

Friendly local bovine
If you're looking for an easy to use and functional breed of unix, then MacOS X is definitely a good bet. I can't wait until it comes out just because of the power that'll be behind it and how easy it will be to use.
 

zerorex

Registered
Humm, you dont find linux to be useable... Well, I guess that depends on what you are useing it for, not it doesnt have a great drag and drop, but that is due to the gui, not linux its self. And some gui's have fetures that others do not. I would be interested to find out which gui you were useing. I personaly dont run linux any more. I have swiched to FreeBSD. But if you say linux is not useable due to the lack of drag and drop, you wouldnt find freebsd to be of any more use. For a gui, I like windowmaker. No drag and drop, heck not even a great start menu. But it is very minimal, quick, and funcitonal. If you are looking for a unix with a well developed gui, go with OS X. It has the power of unix, and the interface that end users can understand.

regards,
~Z~
 

bond1418

Registered
I dont say its not useful because of a lack in drag and drop but it does increase its usefulness and basiclly im a die hard mac fan.
 

zerorex

Registered
I dont consider my self a patriot of any platform. But what I do know is this.
DEC Alpha equipment is expensive.
i386 equipment is cheep, but not nearly as powerful as RISC based equipment.
Sun equipment is expensive.
Apple equipment is expensive, but not nearly as expensive as sun or DEC, and is much more powerful than i386

That being said, I also like Unix, and there are very few Unix alternatives for Mac... until now. Darwin/OS X is a Unix that is native to Mac. Also, if they allow us to control Net Info correctly it will be a considerable step forward for Unix in general. (no more editing 5 /etc scripts to turn on one service). Also, OS X is a Unix that is being aimed at customers, and has the backing of a major company. Thus we will see things developed for OS X that will never be developed for Sun DEC Alpha or other major Unix platforms.

So for me, OS X on ppc hardware sounds like the best path.



[Edited by zerorex on 02-20-2001 at 10:11 AM]
 

lucifer

Registered
I agree with most of the previous posts. Mac OS X is a really good and usable Unix. The gui is the most advanced I've seen on a mainstream OS. The Unix underbelly is also very good, but right now is a little raw. Some files are incomplete for OS X, and compiling apps sometimes takes a little more effort than on the other major Unices (Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris). This is probably mostly due to the fact that the beta is a snapshot in the Apple development cycle where they have not yet completed the underlying architecture. I am definitely looking forward to having NetInfo mature into a complete admin tool.
 

AdmiralAK

Simply Daemonic
Personally I have used a few unix type OSs on the mac and on other platforms. I have to agree with all the above posts. given a choice between OS X and linux I would choose OS X. (OpenBSD & NetBSD dont really appeal to me).

THe reason is that as a mac user for 8 years now I have accumulated a vast variety of software that once I upgrade my OS I would like to be able to use.

Unfortunatelly with linux the only way to accomplish this is with MOL (mac-on-linux, an emulator) and this is kinda like running Windows on your mac via Virtual PC. With OS X I get the best of both worlds. An extremelly nice GUI, very advanced, AND can run my software.

With linux the other problem that I had was having a one buttoned mouse. Most window managers require at least 2 buttons, somthing that a mac doesnt come standard with, and something that seems like a frill to me so I am not going out to buy a two or three button mouse for this OS. Mac OS X thought is diffenent. It functions well with the hardware at hand :)

just my 2 cents :)

Admiral
 
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