Linksys wifi help

iTUNES

Registered
Well I running windows xp with a cable modem hooked up to the linksys router and I cant set up my macbook to receive the wifi signal....
The internet works fine on my pc???but nothing on the mac I was accessing the internet via somebodys wifi connection in the area and since I started messing with the settings that connection does not even work despite full bars of signal
anybody care to enlighten me
 

SGilbert

Registered
This is old, but may help you:

Linksys router setup for Macintosh

Wired settings

WRT54G

First, if you have installed any DSL software like Enternet or MacPoet, you have to disable it or you won't be able to connect to the router.

Connect your Mac to one of the ports numbered 1 to 4 on the LinkSys using a Straight Through CAT5 ethernet patch cable. Make sure the link light on the LinkSys lights for the port that you plugged the Mac into.

Then set your Mac TCP/IP control panel as follows:

Connect Using Ethernet
Configure Manually
IP address = 192.168.1.2
Gateway or Router Address = 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask = 255.255.255.0
Close the TCP/IP control panel and type http://192.168.1.1 into your browser and hit return. This should connect you to the LinkSys Admin program. Do what ever is necessary to make it connect to the internet

Note: Your LinkSys manual will explain that the default UserID is blank (i.e. leave the field blank, don't type in "blank") and the default password is "admin".

Check the Status tab to make sure the router is connecting to the internet. Then scroll down to the entries for the IP addresses of your primary and secondary Domain Name Servers (DNS). Write these down.

Open your TCP/IP control panel. Type the IP addresses of your primary and secondary domain name servers onto separate lines in the Name Server Addr. box. Close the Control Panel.

You should now be able to connect to the internet.

If you have more than one Mac, the settings for the second and third Macs are exactly the same except you have to increase the IP address by one (ie., use 192.168.1.3 for one and 192.168.1.4 for the next, and so on.)

Firmware upgrades: Try Practically Networked dot com

P.S. Don't forget to write down your settings before upgrading because upgrading may restore the router to the factory default settings.

I use MacTFTP Client to apply the firmware updates. The Mac TFTP Client is shareware and I am happy to say is one I have paid for, finally. It is well worth the $12 USD spent. It can be used to see if you like it, use it, etc.

Credit for the above help should go to John Strung and his postings on the MacFixItForums.

Wired Settings OS X specific (10.4.8 control panel)

This is the Mac OS I am using

Open System Preferences

Select Network

Location: Select Edit Locations > Rename. Give your current setup a name i.e. <service provider> Cable or DSL Modem, this will help if ever you need to remove the router to troubleshoot a modem issue with your service provider, many do not support routers.

Location: Select New Location, give it a name i.e. WRT54G Wired

Show: Select Network Port configurations. Un-check Internal Modem and Airport. Drag Built-in Ethernet to the top of the list. Your Mac will try to establish a network connection using this list and from top to bottom. Give it a clear path by placing the method you want at the top and disable the methods you do not want to use.

Now at the Show area select Built-in Ethernet

TCP/IP Tab

Configure: Manually
IP Address: 192.168.1.2
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Router: 192.168.1.1
DNS Servers: Provided by your service provider
Finally - Apply Now to activate these settings.

You should be able to surf using these wired settings.

So you have more than one Mac to connect, the IP Address for each additional machine should be increased by one.

Router: 192.168.1.1
1st Mac: 192.168.1.2
2nd Mac: 192.168.1.3
3rd Mac: 192.168.1.4
You get the picture.
Wireless Settings OS X specific (10.4.8 control panel)

Open System Preferences

Select Network

If you didn't follow the Wired Settings above, do this first. Location: Select Edit Locations > Rename. Give your current setup a name i.e. <service provider> Cable or DSL Modem, this will help if ever you need to remove the router to troubleshoot a modem issue with your service provider, many do not support routers.

Location: Select New Location, give it a name i.e. WRT54G Wireless

Show: Select Network Port configurations. Un-check Internal Modem and Built-in Ethernet. Drag Airport to the top of the list. Your Mac will try to establish a network connection using this list and from top to bottom. Give it a clear path by placing the method you want at the top and disable the methods you do not want to use.

Now at the Show area select Airport

TCP/IP Tab

Configure: Using DHCP
Airport Tab :: Select the setting that best suites what you need. I suggest you check the Show Airport status in the menu bar.

Apply Now

Click on the menu bar AP icon and select Turn Airport ON

You should shortly have a working wireless connection.

Security

I strongly recommend changing the default password for the router from "admin" to something unique. The default administrator's password is often known to hackers.

Change the SSID - the name you give your wireless network. Hackers know many of the default SSIDs and can use them to join your network. Infact, the best setting is disable SSID broadcasting.

Additionally, I recommend enabling the WPA Pre-Shared Key encryption feature of the router. There are two encryption options for WPA Pre-Shared Key, TKIP and AES. This will prevent anyone from using your network and dragging your connection down. Plus it gives peace of mind.

The Wireless MAC Filters feature allows you to control which wireless-equipped Macs and/or PCs may or may not communicate with the Router's depending on their MAC addresses. To disable the Wireless MAC Filters feature, keep the default setting, Disable. To set up a filter, click Enable, and follow these instructions:

If you want to block specific wireless-equipped Macs and/or PCs from communicating with the Router, then keep the default setting, Prevent Macs and/or PCs listed from accessing the wireless network. If you want to allow specific wireless-equipped Macs and/or PCs to communicate with the Router, then click the radio button next to Permit only Macs and/or PCs listed to access the wireless network.
Click the Edit MAC Filter List button. Enter the appropriate MAC addresses into the MAC fields. Note: For each MAC field, the MAC address should be entered in this format: xxxxxxxxxxxx (the x's represent the actual characters of the MAC address).
Click the Save Settings button to save your changes. Click the Cancel Changes button to cancel your unsaved changes. Click the Close button to return to the Advanced Wireless screen without saving changes.
Combine this feature with shared-key WPA-TKIP or WPA-AES, disable SSID broadcasting and a good password, you'd have close to the best security available, short of setting up a VPN.

If anyone has problems or comments, let me know. Tell me about it.

Take a look at my other page! Ed Goham :: Hardware and software (Mac OS X) and more


Copyright © 2002-2006 by Ed Goham All rights reserved.
 
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