OSX, or linux or BSD

tuco

Registered
Brand new to the unix world. Was considering getting yellow dog linux for my G3 Power Book (Bronze), also looking at netbsd. After reading a bit about OSX due out soon I have a few questions.

1. Will OSX allow me to learn unix, or would I be better off with YDL?

2. I would like to set up a server and host a home page and a mail server. Mainly just to learn about the process. Would OSX fit that need?

3. I am going to get OSX when it comes out so my main question is, is that going to fit my needs or should I get linux also?

4. I understand that freeBSD is a part of OSX, but is it actually usable? Can I use BSD programs, etc.

Thanks for your advice and help.

p.s. any newsgroups or mailing lists devoted to OSX?
 

strobe

Puny Member
Originally posted by tuco
1. Will OSX allow me to learn unix, or would I be better off with YDL?
Yes, you can learn UNIX in OS X and it\'s actually easier than learning it otherwise! You can use a browser without first learning how to launch it to read UNIX tutorials online, and you can use ManOpen to read UNIX man files which is a lot easier than using the man command.


2. I would like to set up a server and host a home page and a mail server. Mainly just to learn about the process. Would OSX fit that need?
Yes, it\'s trivial.


3. I am going to get OSX when it comes out so my main question is, is that going to fit my needs or should I get linux also?
Stick with OS X.


4. I understand that freeBSD is a part of OSX, but is it actually usable? Can I use BSD programs, etc.
Stick with OS X.


Thanks for your advice and help.

p.s. any newsgroups or mailing lists devoted to OSX?
Stick with http://www.macosx.com |-)
 

vext

Registered
Originally posted by tuco
Brand new to the unix world. Was considering getting yellow dog linux for my G3 Power Book (Bronze), also looking at netbsd. After reading a bit about OSX due out soon I have a few questions.

1. Will OSX allow me to learn unix, or would I be better off with YDL?
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I suggest LinuxPPC 2000. I think it's Red Hat based.


2. I would like to set up a server and host a home page and a mail server. Mainly just to learn about the process. Would OSX fit that need?
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Either will work. They both run apache and a mail server.


3. I am going to get OSX when it comes out so my main question is, is that going to fit my needs or should I get linux also?
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Why not try both? It's fun


4. I understand that freeBSD is a part of OSX, but is it actually usable? Can I use BSD programs, etc.
----------------------------------------------------
FreeBSD is a little harder than linux...
 

parallax

Registered
Brand new to the unix world. Was considering getting yellow dog linux for my G3 Power Book (Bronze), also looking at netbsd. After reading a bit about OSX due out soon I have a few questions.

1. Will OSX allow me to learn unix, or would I be better off with YDL?

You betcha. You'll find that the GUI of OS X ties into UNIX, so that you'll have a visual representation of what seems abstract. If you ever want the "feel" of a text-only operating system, log in as ">console" (no password) when the login screen pops up. Beware: Screen scrolling is somewhat slow. Just type "exit" to get back to the login screen.

2. I would like to set up a server and host a home page and a mail server. Mainly just to learn about the process. Would OSX fit that need?

You betcha. OS X comes with Apache pre-installed. You could always try to install the latest version for the fun of it. It also comes with Perl, which is an extremely handy scripting language for things like maintainence and CGI.

3. I am going to get OSX when it comes out so my main question is, is that going to fit my needs or should I get linux also?

Probably should fit your needs... The only thing you'd worry about is ports for Darwin. But the way it's looking, ports should be no problem to find. Already XFree86 (The thing UNIX programs use to draw graphics) has been ported successfully.

4. I understand that freeBSD is a part of OSX, but is it actually usable? Can I use BSD programs, etc.

Yes. Most UNIX software comes with source (some with no binaries at all), so that you just have to compile it (this is partly because so it'll work under mutations of UNIX).
Thanks for your advice and help.

p.s. any newsgroups or mailing lists devoted to OSX?

This one :)
 

Cobey4

Registered
if you really want to learn a lot about Unix you should install Linux, it will force you to learn a lot about it. Also Linux is much more flexible and has a faster GUI than OSX. LInuxxPPC 2000 is good but Yellow Dog Linux's upcomming workstation (not the champion server) release sounds even better (but it isn't out yet)
 

AdmiralAK

Simply Daemonic
If you want to try linux too there is also the option of SUSE linux which comes with several CDs worth of shareware and freeware for linux. THere is a PPC version of SUSE linux. I bought LinuxPPC, and I like it (although modem wise I have not gotten it to work) but I would try SUSE first if I had to do it again.
on the BSD front there is OpenBSD and NetBSD.

Admiral
 

lucifer

Registered
I have used most of the major flavors of unix, and have so far preferred OS X. Linux is very fine, and has many applications ported for it. It works very well for a desktop system. My major gripe is the interface. It is very clunky and not at all attractive to look at. I look forward to what the folks at Eazel do to improve the interface. I use FreeBSD for my server needs because of its superior security and performance. It is a bit more of a challenge to get up and running than linux, but if you really need a top rate server environment, one of the BSD's should excel. My desktop work is within OS X because of its flexibility. It also shows promise to evolve into one of the more comprehensive branches of unix. NetInfo may very well replace many of the disparate etc files. OS X doesn't have as many unix applications ported to it, but that is rapidly changing. Usually it just takes modifying a header file, or linking the config.guess into the untarred/unzipped directory before configuring.

I'm happy that Apple has chosen to develop the underpinnings of OS X from BSD. It doesn't have the buzz that linux does, but as a mature unix it can't be beat.

Also, the Cocoa framework is fantastic to program in. It is different from your typical C++ programming, but the change is worth it. And, Apple is definitely making great strides in providing more documentation and resources.
 
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