root perms and performance issues

pacolov

Registered
hi folks!

1. i like to have full root rights in my cli. at the moment i'm doing so by using su but i want to have full control over my whole system and this is only possible as root (good ol' os < x :). how can i permanent root permissions?

2. some performance issues: i got a imac dv ppc g3 400 mz with 192mb ram and a 10+30gb harddrive (int, ext) and, well, in my oppinion it's quite a little slow with graphics like scrollbars, window resizing or drawing a marker rectangle. over all: os x is slow!! this is what i want to say and it really annoys me. what can i do to get it work faster? got os 10.0.3 so far.

cu,
pacolov
 

Solaris

Official something...
In unix, 'root' is just the user with a UID of 0 (zero). So all you need to do is change your UID to 0. I assume this would be done somewhere within Netinfo.

However, the first thing you learn about unix security is restricting root access. Thwart the inherent security features of unix at your own peril!
 

droid

Registered
Originally posted by pacolov
hi folks!

1. i like to have full root rights in my cli. at the moment i'm doing so by using su but i want to have full control over my whole system and this is only possible as root (good ol' os < x :). how can i permanent root permissions?
This is a very, very bad idea. Use sudo to emulate the root environment. Apple has restricted the root account on purpose, and with good reason. Running around as root, doing whatever you please, making directories, editing files, deleting stuff, etc, is a one-way ticket to disaster. It also opens up some security issues (what happens if you run a trojan horse program as root? you could obliterate your hard drive). Please stick with sudo.


2. some performance issues: i got a imac dv ppc g3 400 mz with 192mb ram and a 10+30gb harddrive (int, ext) and, well, in my oppinion it's quite a little slow with graphics like scrollbars, window resizing or drawing a marker rectangle. over all: os x is slow!! this is what i want to say and it really annoys me. what can i do to get it work faster? got os 10.0.3 so far.
os x makes heavy use of altivec-enhanced code to make up for all the silly eye candy. either get yourself a g4 or disable all of the eye-candy... turn off dock magnification, disable window zooming into the dock, turn off terminal transparency, etc.

hth,
alex
 

Tigger

Bring mich zum Licht!
Originally posted by droid
os x makes heavy use of altivec-enhanced code to make up for all the silly eye candy.
I read everywhere that X uses Altivec.
But I also read X is slow on G4. (As on everything)

Has someone a G4 and a G3 with the same clockspeed and same Ram and has run OS X on both of them? I would like to know if there is really a noticable difference.
 

genecutl

Registered
I haven't done the side by side comparison, but from my own experience, OS X
on my dual G4 400 at work blows away performance on all the G3s I've seen.

I think both the G4 chip and the dual processors (which the cpu monitor shows
are used very effectively) are important speed factors for OS X.
 

frooyo

Registered
One reason why OS X runs so fast on the G4 chip is that Altivec has additional features specific written for the G4 processor.
 
If you realy want to alway be root, just enable the root account (check out www.trickx.com for instructions), then log in as 'root' rathr than your normal user name. Have fun and dont fuck up your system ;)
 

endian

Dis Member
I think these people that want to run as root all the time don't realize that anything they execute as root runs with root permissions! You may say to yourself that you'll be careful and just not do anything stupid (famous last words.. all it takes is one misplaced space in an rm command...) but your chances of being hurt by a malicious or stupid program are enormously increased if that program is running with root permissions. IMO anyone running as root all the time simply doesn't know what they're doing, by definition.
 
Top