Website Design

arkanoid

Registered
I am currently a website designer, I was just wondering what programs are really good for making the website pages, ive had a look at "InDesigns" is that any good.... ive herd you make the website on the program and then it will export the images ect for you.

I did this on "Fireworks (macromedia)" and the text comes out as an image, but supposdly photoshop CS doesnt do this??? im a bit confused now =S
 

texanpenguin

Registered Penguin
Firstly, no offence I'd steer clear of calling yourself a "website designer" without a working understanding of how to design a web-site. It is a misrepresentation of your own ability (even if you're a phenomenal conceptual designer), which could land you in some hot water with clients.

Secondly, the tools you choose to make a web-site with are many and varied. You can make a text-based (or strictly layout based) web-site purely in a text-editing tool such as TextEdit or SubEthaEdit. I use a program called "Tag" for this purpose, since it fills in some of the code as you go.
If you need images, you can make them in Photoshop (or any other photo manipulation tool, such as The GIMP).

Photoshop is bundled with a program explicitly designed for producing images for the web, called "ImageReady". Consult the program's manual for instructions on using the software (if you're familiar with Photoshop, it shouldn't be any sweat at all).

Many people who are not comfortable with coding sites by hand use tools such as Macromedia Dreamweaver and Adobe GoLive. Personally, I hate both of these programs since they encourage the designer to develop web-pages to archaic standards (though they can be used effectively if you so desire).


InDesign is a print layout program designed to compete with QuarkXPress. It is not designed to do web layouts (though, I hear, it *can* be used for this purpose. I don't use InDesign personally).

Fireworks is a tool designed to compete (in a round-about way) with Photoshop and Illustrator. It is good for developing web images too.



I would suggest purchasing a web-design book from any good book store and going through the process of designing and producing web-pages. It's rewarding, but not simple (if done properly).
 

mdnky

[Bobs/Prog/Design:~] mod%
Staff member
Mod
The first question is, do you know HTML and do you know CSS? If not, then you need to learn both first. A good starting point is Designing with Web Standards by Jeffrey Zeldman (might as well learn the proper way the first time around...makes it easier in the long run). Eric Meyer has some good books on CSS which are worth looking into, as do Dave Shea and Dan Cederholm.

If you're familiar with HTML, then text editor programs like BBedit and SKEdit are your best bets. You can use Dreamweaver in code-view mode, but it's slow and sometimes buggy, not to mention the waste of resources from all the extra "junk" built-into the program that hand-coders don't need. Personally, I feel GoLive is a total waste of time...though I haven't tried the latest (CS2) version of it, I doubt anything has changed much. Best bet is to stay away from it.

Graphics can be handled with Photoshop or Fireworks. Grab yourself a copy of Transmit 3 (or another FTP app) for transfers. A folder full of various browsers is also a good tool to keep handy.
 

Robn Kester

I heart nothing
I like Nvu alot for my smaller jobs and cleanups but use Dreamweaver for most my work and BBEdit for coding.
 

arkanoid

Registered
lol, firstly I wouldent "steer clear of calling yourself a "website designer" because Ive being doing it for 5 years, Ive just used Macromdedia suite and I was just wondering really what tools of the trade you lot use. I know HTML and ASP so I would hardly call my self a newb, but you can think watever you want. I agree that fireworks isnt as good for exporting html files and slices (well it sucks). But I know not alot of programs work on MACS so I was just wondering what was out there at the momment.

Anyway thanks for your input (if I can get these windows shares sorted out) =)

I no why you probably thought I was a newb my first post makes the impression lol =) :p
 

Robn Kester

I heart nothing
For the most part anything you can get on Windows is probably available for the Mac... like Photoshop, Illustrator, Freehand, Dreamweaver, GoLive, etc. Some of the smaller shareware/free tools aren't cross platform but most likely there is an equiv of that for each platform.

But, like any kind of design, one program just isnt enough to do everything. Like I said above, I use Nvu (free, nice) and Dreamweaver. But I also use BBEdit for text editing, Transmit for uploading files, Photoshop Elements for cleaning up and editing graphics, Fireworks for spot compression, Flash for interactive elements as needed, and more. There are so many little tools that are invaluable as well that one needs to just play around and see what work for you.

I have been doing design for a long time (early 90s? wow im old), and I am always learning new stuff. Like I learned some PHP and MySQL finally in the last year to do a database site. It's one of the things I love about web design over print design, there is always something new to learn, new ways to design, new styles to pick up, tricks and secrets, etc.

And with the internet, you can pick up ideas, and exchange outlooks all with the magic of forums like these and who knows what you might come up with as a result.

Afterall... Everyone has their own methods but we all get to the same place eventually. :)
 

Robn Kester

I heart nothing
It is a Stuffit archive. Used to be the most common file compression used on Macs, like a zip but for the Mac basically. But can also be decompressed under Windows with the Stuffit Expander (free).
 

texanpenguin

Registered Penguin
I apologise for jumping to conclusions. My bad.

If you're comfortable with text-coding websites, I strongly encourage you to look at Tag and CSSEdit.
 

arkanoid

Registered
ahhh thanks I will do.... whoo! Fineally got my MAC to network to my windows2000server! the only annoying thigs about macs is that the (desktop) connection goes after you shut down! Can i prevent this? I dont want to "connect" everytime its annoying!

I will look @ the programs you have said are good when I get my internet sorted out.... heres a problem

On my server I have a wirless internet (USB) doongle and a on-board LAN card (10/100) When I want to share the internet (which is on my USB wirless doongle) do I share the network card... or the USB adapter?? Also does it work on mac or not ... =S
 

Robn Kester

I heart nothing
You can use an applescript to auto mount that drive at boot... thats what i do, it sends the info and the drives come up from my other machines.

I believe you can also add the drive to your startup items and it will mount but not sure on that one as ive never tried it.
 

arkanoid

Registered
1. thanks - but what the hells the script?
2. weres the startup thingy mabob?
3. What about my other question =)

:D
 

Robn Kester

I heart nothing
The startup stuff is located in Preferences > Users. Each user has a place to add login/startup items. I think you can mount the drive, then add it to this place adn it will mount each time.

The Applescript. I dont have it here (at work), it has its downside if you are worried about passwords, since it sends your passwords in plain text, but it works nicely... I will post it if i remember later when Im home.
 

Robn Kester

I heart nothing
Located in the US here... only 2:31pm right now, the day is young!

Your question regarding sharing your connection. I would say go with the network card over the USB, it will provide faster access (since USB is slower even if its USB 2 than what a PCI card could provide at 100baseT)
 
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