Encrypting Ilife Programs

redjar

Registered
I've used encryption on Windows for some years. Now moving to Macintosh. (Yeah! Finally!) I need to know if it's possible to move some of the iLife apps to an encrypted container/volume/partition on the hard drive? I ask because it was next to impossible to get Windows Media Player, or IExplorer to work exclusively from within an encrpyted volume. I want to move the entire program(s) so that all the data streams produced by the program remain on the encrpyted partition.
Can it work, and does it negatively affect the program's performance?
TIA
 

thendis

Registered
not sure if this will work for applications, but you can use File Valt to encrypt the contents of your Home folder(s) (available in System Preferences under Security, in OS X 10.3 and later). It's more aimed at encrypting files created using apps rather than the apps themselves.

If you install apps inside your Home folder it might work, but I don't think iLife gives you the option of choosing a location other than the HDD/Applications folder.
 

Satcomer

In Geostationary Orbit
I am trying to figure out if you want just the Applications itself or Application communications (sh, telnet, etc) to be encrypted, or both? If you are looking you encryption for certain types there is the PGP family of encryption. Then Applications->Utilties->Disk Utility will create 128 bit encrypted disk images.

Then there are your standard MULTIPLE firewalls (note the stress of multiple firewalls)! Then there is the firewall in reverse called Little Snitch (you will be surprised on how many programs "call home"). Then if you want true encryption on network communications then you need a VPN (Virtual Private Network) suite of Applications.

Lastly if you want true network security, get off the network! Seriously, network security is an ongoing process. Also if one is truly paranoid about security, then destroy all wireless communications(ie computer and telephone). ALL WIRELESS communications have been busted into for a very long time. You can thank the Cold War for that. Most governments have whole agencies dedicated to breaking an air signal.
 
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