Error Code 1309

msbae

Registered
I'm having trouble moving a file onto a 250GB External HDD from one of my school's Power Mac G5's. I try to transfer a .mov I created but, it quits half way giving me the Error code 1309. I've looked at other threads where people have had similar problems. It seems that the drive has to be formatted for Mac to transfer a file as big as mine (13.89GB). That's not going to work, unless WinXP can also read/copy from that kind of drive.

Is it possible to get that file onto the drive without reformatting to a Mac file system?

The drive is formatted as FAT-32. (I don't know why Mac won't write to NTFS. That is very annoying having to delete my partitions and reformat for a simple file transfer!) It's plugged into the USB 2.0 port on the front of the box. FireWire isn't an option with this drive.

Any suggestions? Remember, I have to have WinXP compatibility.
 

bobw

The Late: SuperMacMod
Probably a file size limitation with Fat32. I believe the maximum file size limit is 4 GB.
 

msbae

Registered
I figured that out the hard way. I'm just going to have to re-edit my movie and use a different codec, which I'm doing right now.

I still wonder why MacOSX doesn't write to a NTFS drive. That would make life much easier for all computer users.
 

ElDiabloConCaca

U.S.D.A. Prime
Because NTFS is a proprietary format developed and owned by Microsoft... if Microsoft allowed other companies access to the protocol specifications, I'm sure Linux, Mac OS X, UNIX, and everyone else would implement write functions into their NTFS drivers.

Short answer: because Microsoft won't let them. In the meantime, people are working on independently for various operating systems, like Linux:

http://www.linux-ntfs.org/
 

g/re/p

I can haz cigar?
The drive is formatted as FAT-32. (I don't know why Mac won't write to NTFS.

I thought Fat 32 and NTFS were two different formats.:confused:
 

nixgeek

Mac of the SubGenius! :-)
They are two different filesystems. However, the original poster isn't aware that NTFS is locked up by MS which is why other operating systems don't have write access to it. FAT/FAT32, on the other hand, is available for all OEMs and other manufacturers to use.
 

msbae

Registered
I found a way to reduce the file size of the movie I made, using the Sorenson Video 3 Codec.
I showed a rough cut to an audience yesterday. The sound wasn't always loud enough (I thought I had fixed that, too.) but, it was still a hit.
 

msbae

Registered
Too bad that MS won't allow NTFS to be compatible with other platforms.
 

fryke

Moderator
Staff member
Mod
Well, that's usually called a "workaround". A fix implies that you could tell us how you "fixed" either the FAT32 volume format or Mac OS X' support of NTFS. ;)
 

dave24

Registered
Sigh,
NTFS IS compatible with Mac OS X. I'm currently running a terabyte file server on Windows 2003 and have several dozen macs connecting to and saving files to shares. The user accounts authenticate vs. active directory and file and folder permissions are set though with limitations. Please get it out of your head that the two files systems don't talk to each other, because they do with the latest updates to Mac OS X.
 

ElDiabloConCaca

U.S.D.A. Prime
Sigh,
NTFS IS compatible with Mac OS X. I'm currently running a terabyte file server on Windows 2003 and have several dozen macs connecting to and saving files to shares. The user accounts authenticate vs. active directory and file and folder permissions are set though with limitations. Please get it out of your head that the two files systems don't talk to each other, because they do with the latest updates to Mac OS X.
This has nothing to do with the format of the drives, since they're being shared over a network. I could invent a filesystem called "Jeff's Badass Filesystem" as a competitor to NTFS and FAT32 and share it via some network, and ANY computer capable of connecting to my computer on the network could read and write to the drive... regardless of the format of the drive. As long as the host computer understands the format, then any computer in the world capable of connecting to that share via a network can read and write to the drive.

It is only when drives are used locally that the format of the drive comes into play -- and in that sense, yes, NTFS and Mac OS X do NOT play well together (NTFS is read-only under Mac OS X).

Your server is Windows 2003, which "understands" NTFS perfectly. The Mac OS X computers connect via the network to your server, and your server takes care of the reading and writing of the data to the NTFS drive. Try taking the NTFS drives out of your server, connect them locally via IDE or USB or Firewire to one of your Macs, and you'll see quite plainly that NTFS and Mac OS X don't exactly mesh well together.
 

msbae

Registered
I already solved this problem months ago. I started experimenting with the codecs I was using for that movie and found one that greatly reduced the file size. MPEG-4 is dead, long live Sorenson 3! :D
 

dskwared

Registered
I'm having a similar issue where I need to move a file larger than 4 GB over to my FAT32 external drive. At first, I was concerned about Windoze compatibility, but I guess now it is no longer a concern. Is it possible to format the drive from FAT32 to HFS+ or whatever format Mac OS X uses while keeping all existing files on the drive in tact?
 

ElDiabloConCaca

U.S.D.A. Prime
I'm having a similar issue where I need to move a file larger than 4 GB over to my FAT32 external drive. At first, I was concerned about Windoze compatibility, but I guess now it is no longer a concern. Is it possible to format the drive from FAT32 to HFS+ or whatever format Mac OS X uses while keeping all existing files on the drive in tact?
The FAT32 filesystem cannot support files larger than 4GB in size, so that's why you can't move a file larger than 4GB to the drive.

No, you cannot change the format of the drive without losing the data on the drive. You must back the data up to another device, reformat the drive, then move the data back.
 

Kees Buijs

Registered
Crud. I was hoping I wouldn't have to do that. Thanks for the info.
It is however possible to split your drive in 2 partitions, reformat one part and than move the file to the second partition.

I do not know if there is a mac os x tool for that, but with partition magic (for windows) you can split an existing drive in 2 partitions and use them indepently afterwards. How seuccessfull this is, will depend on the available space on the drive and the way files are stored on the drive. Be sure to have an adequaat backup (but if you have, why bother, just reformat).


Good Luck, Kees
 
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