Frozen Curser

Bob P.

Registered
Here’s another frozen curser challenge. I’ve got a MacBook Air, Mid 2013. As soon as I input the user name and password the curser freezes. The boot process continues behind the frozen curser. When I’m asked to select an option the curser stays frozen and I’m out of business. I’ve tried a Safe boot, a Internet system reload, completed the PRAM/NVRAM reset process, the VRAM reset and loaded a new system from a boot thumb dive that has worked on other Macs. I’v also used the verbose mode but there doesn’t show any errors. The simple solution would be reformat and restore from a backup. Of cource my backup it is 4 months old and the files I need were created after the backup. I have a second MacBook Air, could I use the Target process in any way to solve my problem? I would think the system restore, not from the restore partition, but direct from the Apple server would do the same thing. I’m out of options. Does anybody have a way out?
 

Cheryl

Rosie Moderator
Staff member
Mod
Have you tried using a mouse? It could be your track pad is the part that is not responding.
 

Bob P.

Registered
Have you tried using a mouse? It could be your track pad is the part that is not responding.
Good idea. However, I have control of the curser from boot up through account name, password and first account screen. it's only after the splash screen that the curser freezes,
for example I can't move the curser to open a file on the desk top.
 

DeltaMac

Tech
Do you keep control of the cursor when you boot up in safe mode?
Restart, holding the shift key. Safe mode prevents certain parts of the system from loading, and may be enough to allow you to continue to control your cursor.
If it does, you can try a simple reboot to see if that safe boot fixed your issue (safe mode deletes certain cache files, and performs other sorts of maintenance to the system, the safe boot sometimes helps.)
 

Bob P.

Registered
Do you keep control of the cursor when you boot up in safe mode?
Restart, holding the shift key. Safe mode prevents certain parts of the system from loading, and may be enough to allow you to continue to control your cursor.
If it does, you can try a simple reboot to see if that safe boot fixed your issue (safe mode deletes certain cache files, and performs other sorts of maintenance to the system, the safe boot sometimes helps.)
 

Bob P.

Registered
I’ve tried a Safe boot, a Internet system reload using an Apple server to supply the replacement system, I've also completed the PRAM/NVRAM reset process and loaded a new system from a boot thumb dive that has worked on other Macs. I’ve also used the verbose mode but the Unix log shows no errors. The simple solution would be reformat and restore from a backup. But.... my backup is months old and I need data from last week. I have a second MacBook Air, do you think I can use a Target process in any way to solve my problem? (Sorry to take so much of your time but my wife is getting fed up with my crying. Thanks for the help.)
 

DeltaMac

Tech
If all you really need is a more current backup, then do that...
I assume (as you did not say) that safe mode did not change the cursor issue.
So, try booting up to the root user.

You have to enable the root user to do that, but that's only a few steps to try.
Here's how you can do that - should work from safe boot mode.

You said you tried safe boot. You did NOT say if the cursor ever works in safe boot mode.
You also did not say if you tried a USB mouse. Try it even if you believe it did not work before. This is really important, I think.
If it does work in safe boot mode, then you need to enable the root user, which allows you to do a lot of things that even an admin account doesn't allow.
Once you have the root enabled, you log out, then log back in to the root user account.

If that really doesn't work either (and the cursor simply freezes even in safe boot mode), then your quickest way out is to boot to an external drive with whatever OS X system you wish to install on your external drive. All you need is about 20 GB of space on a partition or drive, to be enough for installing a system that you can use to get your data from the drive, whatever else you need to do.
 
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