Routing Tables

supanatral

Registered
I want to configure my wireless router to have all the wireless connections to be on a different subnet then the computers that are wired. I know that this sounds useless, but I do have a good reason for doing this.

After setting my router to 192.168.2.1 and turning on DHCP, I entered this information:
Destination LAN IP: 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.1.1

192.168.1.1 is our FreeBSD gateway. does that information sound correct?
I don't know what the difference is between the destination lan Ip and gateway though.
 

Kees Buijs

Registered
I want to configure my wireless router to have all the wireless connections to be on a different subnet then the computers that are wired. I know that this sounds useless, but I do have a good reason for doing this.

After setting my router to 192.168.2.1 and turning on DHCP, I entered this information:
Destination LAN IP: 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.1.1

192.168.1.1 is our FreeBSD gateway. does that information sound correct?
I don't know what the difference is between the destination lan Ip and gateway though.
This is no problem. You can enter this information in the NETWORK pane. You configure the wired nic with the required info (even DHCP) and also the wireless nic with the required info (even DHCP with all info completely different, ofcourse the ip-number must be different for both nic).

I had such a setup myself on a notebook, where i access the company network wired and internet access was wireless. The only real advantage was that internet access was still possible without wired connection and without reconfiguration.


Good luck, kees
 

supanatral

Registered
From What I understand, I would leave my wireless router's lan IP to 192.168.1.8?
Then turn on DHCP to give a range from 192.168.2.1 - 192.168.2.255?
So then I would add that routing table information?
Also, does that information look right?

I've never done this before so forgive me. Do you have a good walk through of what you need to do? The only ones that I've found pretty much say "put the destination lan IP in the box" but the issue is that I don't know what a dstination lan IP is other then understanding a general idea by the name.
 

Satcomer

In Geostationary Orbit
Well if this is a BSD router then go into that configuration and configure the vlan for the wired ports and ports then different settings in the wireless card. With a BSD router this should be easy, if you know how to configure the BSD router.
 

Kees Buijs

Registered
From What I understand, I would leave my wireless router's lan IP to 192.168.1.8?
Then turn on DHCP to give a range from 192.168.2.1 - 192.168.2.255?
So then I would add that routing table information?
Also, does that information look right?

I've never done this before so forgive me. Do you have a good walk through of what you need to do? The only ones that I've found pretty much say "put the destination lan IP in the box" but the issue is that I don't know what a dstination lan IP is other then understanding a general idea by the name.
Are we talking over 1 or 2 routers ? If one router, this being possible depends on the router having a separate DHCP server for WIRELESS and for WIRED. Otheriwise i guess it will not be possible, unless you use static ip-numbers. Also the netmask might be set to a different value.

So what I describe is based on having 2 dhcp servers (2 routers), not for 1 dhcp server (1 router).


Good luck, Kees
 

supanatral

Registered
Well, my FreeBSD I guess would be considered a router, so yes, I have two routers and both would have DHCP enabled since I'm only using a class c IP address.

Do both routers need to be configured to talk to eachother? or just one?

Satcomer: I haven't had a chance to try that seeing as my notebook just got sent in to get replaced by Apple, but I'm going to give that a try if I can borrow a computer from someone else today.
 

arri

Registered
is it possible ppl are talking about different things here? hmm.. confusing..

anyway, i guess you mean:
your freebsd-box is connected to the internet, doing NAT/DHCP for the internal (wired) network, and you want to connect your wifi-router, but server a seperate subnet wirelessly..

the wifi-router can do DHCP, so easiest is probably to just have the wifi-router get an ip from the freebsd machine, and have it do NAT/DHCP/firewall itsself too in some other ip-range.
technically not exactly the seperate subnet you mean, but kind of..

and otherwise you need to configure an additional subnet for the freebsd-box' lan-nic, run a DHCP-server for the wired subnet, and either run a second DHCP-server on the fbsdbox with the wifirouter being a simple repeater, or connect the wifirouter using a static ip, and run dhcp from there.
 
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