What Is The Process For Restoring Previous Osx After An Osx Upgrade

TuckerdogAVL

Registered
I'm about to upgrade from 10.6.8 to Yosemite. I think I have all my software issues ironed out (except for my GPS Tom Tom, which according to them, I'm supposed to keep an old computer so I can install my yearly $60 free upgrades, but I digress):

What is the process should something go wrong?

Since I'm going to be installing Yosemite, just say, for whatever reason, something goes squirrelly and I have to reinstall the Time Machine Backup? Does the TMBU have the 10.6.8 on it with all the security fixes? etc?

Just want to be ready if I find myself with a 1)white screen 2) a little mac thing or 3) a blue screen spinning. Thanks.
 

Cheryl

Rosie Moderator
Staff member
Mod
I suggest - before doing the upgrade to back up your hard drive to a separate drive (other than the partition used for TM) using Super Duper or similar app. Then if something does go wrong (probably won’t) you have a back up to restore to.
 

TuckerdogAVL

Registered
I suggest - before doing the upgrade to back up your hard drive to a separate drive (other than the partition used for TM) using Super Duper or similar app. Then if something does go wrong (probably won’t) you have a back up to restore to.
This assumes I know what you are talking about and understand the process. Since I use Apple's awesome time machine, how would I backup on another external, without purchasing another external. We need 700gb. And isn't this about time and efficiency as well? Just wishing to be educated.
 
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DeltaMac

Tech
Snow Leopard Time Machine gives you a full backup.
The problem is, that backup is not bootable.
If things go wrong with the upgrade from 10.6.8 to 10.10 - all in one leap - then you still have all your stuff backed up, but reverting to Snow Leopard isn't always a simple task.. One reason for that is that some users report that a Yosemite boot won't see a Snow Leopard system, which can mean lots of challenges if you don't have a way to easily wipe and revert back to Snow Leopard. It happens, but not to everyone. If you are willing to accept that risk (and you may get a good result, with no problems going to Yosemite. That happens, too! The point that Cheryl, and other long time users, make is that you would like to protect your files, and the system that you run, whatever it might be. A good backup, is a bootable backup, particularly with a big-step upgrade like you are doing. Go to the Superduper site and see what you think. It's easy software to use - and yes, you need another external drive if that's how you want to proceed. http://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html

Or, take a chance - you may be completely fine with a simple upgrade.
You DO have 4GB of RAM, or more installed, correct? And, great results will happen if you have an SSD, rather than a spinning hard drive.
Lots of RAM plus SSD will be a great way to treat Yosemite.
 

TuckerdogAVL

Registered
Snow Leopard Time Machine gives you a full backup.
The problem is, that backup is not bootable.
If things go wrong with the upgrade from 10.6.8 to 10.10 - all in one leap - then you still have all your stuff backed up, but reverting to Snow Leopard isn't always a simple task.. One reason for that is that some users report that a Yosemite boot won't see a Snow Leopard system, which can mean lots of challenges if you don't have a way to easily wipe and revert back to Snow Leopard. It happens, but not to everyone. If you are willing to accept that risk (and you may get a good result, with no problems going to Yosemite. That happens, too! The point that Cheryl, and other long time users, make is that you would like to protect your files, and the system that you run, whatever it might be. A good backup, is a bootable backup, particularly with a big-step upgrade like you are doing. Go to the Superduper site and see what you think. It's easy software to use - and yes, you need another external drive if that's how you want to proceed. http://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html

Or, take a chance - you may be completely fine with a simple upgrade.
You DO have 4GB of RAM, or more installed, correct? And, great results will happen if you have an SSD, rather than a spinning hard drive.
Lots of RAM plus SSD will be a great way to treat Yosemite.
UGH.
Thanks for the clarification. Also, I don't have unlimited funds to just go purchase 1T externals just for a bootable drive or that much SSD. I will check out superduper ..

But on the SSD suggestion, do they even make that much? This is the problem I run into whenever I start thinking about upgrading my 2009 MacBookPro. Not only do I have to be worried about software working, worried about migration, but most of the intense work I do, is my hobby (and occasionally paid) video editing with iMOVIE. Have you ever tried to work with video files saved to an external while the software is on the computer? It's almost unbearable. I can afford $1300 or thereabouts for a new system.

So, another question then is, are the SSD computers so much faster than a HD that I could store my 500 gb of video files, for example, on an external, and edit on-the-fly with the iMOVIE on the computer's SSD? Because I can't do that now. I archive files on the HD, or a move them over when done editing, but there's usually way too much spinning (and this is with 8gb mem) to be able to do it without pulling my hair (what's left of it) out.

PS I do have diskwarrior if it has any comparison to superduper. (however, no idea on whether the version I have will work with yosemite).
 

TuckerdogAVL

Registered
Thanks for the info on SuperDuper. I've done a quick read and I'm wondering how SandBox enters into the scheme of things.
And is is possible to partition a hard drive with 10.6.8 still on it to use with programs that will not run in Yosemite? You know, where I would choose to boot into 10.6.8 by holding down the "C" and choosing to launch in 10.6.8, then open a particular program that runs now in 10.6.8, but I know won't in Yosemite... then simply rebooting back into Yosemite when done. Possible?
 

DeltaMac

Tech
If your Mac will boot to that 10.6.8 system - you can copy it, as a backup, to any convenient external drive, or a drive partition with enough space for your needs.
You can't boot to a system partition with "C" - unless it happens to be on a CD/DVD. Just hold Option when you restart, and you will see the boot chooser screen.

BTW - you mentioned Tomtom Home in your first post - where you seem to think that won't work with something newer than 10.6.8
I have it here, and the latest version runs just fine for me on 10.10
http://us.support.tomtom.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/5122

SO - if that's the only software that concerns you, then it may not be an issue if you upgrade.
 

TuckerdogAVL

Registered
If your Mac will boot to that 10.6.8 system - you can copy it, as a backup, to any convenient external drive, or a drive partition with enough space for your needs.
You can't boot to a system partition with "C" - unless it happens to be on a CD/DVD. Just hold Option when you restart, and you will see the boot chooser screen.

BTW - you mentioned Tomtom Home in your first post - where you seem to think that won't work with something newer than 10.6.8
I have it here, and the latest version runs just fine for me on 10.10
http://us.support.tomtom.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/5122

SO - if that's the only software that concerns you, then it may not be an issue if you upgrade.
How do you do it then?

I don't have the latest version. I have a five yr old tom tom not upgradable accrdng to the mfr.
 

DeltaMac

Tech
Ah, then what you are saying is that you can't upgrade the software, because your GPS hardware is too old? I guess that means that you can't update or add maps or anything else?
I don't have a Tomtom at all, but just tried out the software to see if it works on Yosemite.
So, just curious - Why would you continue paying anything for upgrades that you _don't_ get?
Are you saying that the newer software doesn't support your old Tomtom? Have you tried it out? You apparently don't need to upgrade your OS X for that - it just supports newer OS X versions, too.
Is that really the only software that you need to continue to use?
 

TuckerdogAVL

Registered
Yes, that is correct. They decided not to support the Tom Tom I have any more. Purchased a few years ago and it died and was under warranty with Best Buy. Was able to "upgrade" with the warranty to annual free upgrades, regularly $60/year. Sweet. Then using RoaringApps found it may not be supported. Went to the Tom Tom website and indeed found that so. So, sent a note to support to confirm and was told in so many words, "Yes, this is correct; Use an older computer with an OS that is supported," and then my favorite excuse used to end all conversation, "sorry for the inconvenience."

Re: software ... Basically, the old GPS (which I rarely actually use anymore) and then there's the Lightscribe, where occasionally I need to use that, but not imperative. I've checked almost all the software and I think I'll be fine actually, so it's not the deal-breaker, just an annoyance throwing out something that is perfectly fine (maybe eBay?) Same goes for a perfectly excellent scanner I purchased 10 years ago for doing negatives and slides (Canoscan 8400) though I think they wised up and now support it (somewhat, no buttons but it works).

I do have CS4 from years ago when I worked in an agency and we had it supplied to us; I no longer have the serial number etc, so I'm sure I'll lose it. But, I'm not that concerned as I once was; I really only use Photoshop now, I like the ease of iMovie over Premiere for what I do, and I've found some good programs that can replace the Photoshop, so if CS4 doesn't come across it's no great loss (and I'm not going to put the money into that when I would rather purchase two new systems and an ipad for that money. It's more about staying within a budget and getting the best system now available for that budget (And not losing data and photos and movies).
 
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TuckerdogAVL

Registered
Did it work fine for you after up upgraded to Yosemite, and it migrated, or did you have to reinstall from your disks? I know it works with a clean install. Not the issue.
 

jbarley

One more, for the road!
Go to the Superduper site and see what you think. It's easy software to use - and yes, you need another external drive if that's how you want to proceed. http://www.shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html
SupeDuper will make a bootable clone to the same HDD as your Time Machine exists on.
This was something that Shirt-Pocket the authors of SuperDuper came up with when Time Machine made it's appearance.
Below is a quote from SuperDupers web page...
" It's the perfect complement to Time Machine, allowing you to store a bootable backup alongside your Time Machine volume—and it runs beautifully on your Mac!"

I have tried this just to make sure it works, and it does.
But personally I never liked the idea of having two backup strategies on the same HDD.
 
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