No disk when installing Mac OS x?

#1
The other day, I was on my Macbook Pro, I set it aside and went to do something. When I came back upstairs, it was acting really slow, and I couldn't do much, so I turned it off. When I turned it back on it immediately started making this clicking noise (Now anytime the computer is powered on, it makes the clicking noise.) and the apple logo never showed up. In it's place, however, there was a hazard sign. So I decided to try to re-install the Mac OS x software disk. (I think that's what it is called.. I'm fairly new to the mac word, heh. :l) When I turned the computer on, the apple logo appeared, but after loading.. this appeared:


After I let that load, the normal disk installation process began, but when it came time for me to choose a disk... there weren't any there to be selected.. here is a picture:



I have never dropped it... although I have carried it in my schoolbag.. I don't know if anything happened to it during that time, but I assume it's possible.. I'm not sure if it's even physical damage.. but I am guessing so from the clicking noises.. Or it could not be physical, so I figured posting here was worth a shot..

Sorry if I'm not explaining this very well.. I really have no idea what I am doing, or what is even going on.. haha. Thank you for any help, it is really appreciated.
 
#2
I think your hard drive has failed.
Boot to your OS X installer DVD again.
When you get to that screen where you can select your hard drive (it's blank at the moment), go to the Utilities menu at the top of your screen, and choose Disk Utility.
Do you see the hard drive listed in the Disk Utility window?
If not, then your hard drive has likely failed, and might not even be accessible to recover any files or other software.
Replace the hard drive (or have a service shop replace it)
Reinstall OS X using your OS X DVDs.
Recover your files/pictures/music from your back up.
 
#3
I think your hard drive has failed.
Boot to your OS X installer DVD again.
When you get to that screen where you can select your hard drive (it's blank at the moment), go to the Utilities menu at the top of your screen, and choose Disk Utility.
Do you see the hard drive listed in the Disk Utility window?
If not, then your hard drive has likely failed, and might not even be accessible to recover any files or other software.
Replace the hard drive (or have a service shop replace it)
Reinstall OS X using your OS X DVDs.
Recover your files/pictures/music from your back up.
It's not there.. :l I guess it has failed then. Thank you for the clarification, I guess I'll have to take it to apple. :)
 
#4
I have the same issue, but my HD is listed in disc utility, but not in the box to install Max OS X?? Any help appreciated!! No back up of recent graduation photos :(
 
#5
Repair the disk with Disk Utility. Keep repairing until done. That might fix the problem.

If not prepare to spend about $200 to $300.

1. $100-200: for a Big Ass External HD to which you will henceforth back up your data. You can even use a cloning program like SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner so you can forever boot off the Ex-HD when necessary.

2. $100 for DiskWarrior--this has saved more asses than Federal Ass Salvage Authority. IF this does not fix your volume problem--it can usually create a disk image or at least create a version of your dying Int-HD.

You then move your data over to your Ex-HD.

You can then wipe the Int-HD and check its "SMART" status. It IS possible your volume got corrupted beyond repair--this happened to me, last week, with an Ex-HD I accidentally disconnected because, well, I am an idiot. Same procedure saved the data I had yet to back up that day.

However, assuming your Int-HD is frelled beyond repair--as in dying--you can at least now boot to your Ex-HD, look at your precious data of [CENSORED--Ed.], and surf Al Gore's interwebs whilst you purchase a new Int-HD which, frankly, you can replace yourself.

It IS possible, that with just an Ex-HD, you boot with your Installation Disk, use Disk Utility to initialize the Ex-HD for Mac, then LOAD your OS on the Ex-HD, boot from the Ex-HD and . . . you may have to sacrifice a virgin as well . . . "see" the data on your Ex-HD. I have had that happen just once. Usually, you need to use a program that fixes the volume sufficiently. With a dying disk, you introduce errors and the like which further the mess.

Good luck!

--J.D.
 
#6
If you ended up here because you are installing OS X after having some flavor of Linux/Unix/whatever the f*** installed, and you know your hard drive is good...

Make sure you reformat the drive (after exporting s*** you want to an external drive) to OS X (journaled) using the disk utility application.

If you don't know how to get to Disk Utility from the fresh install wizard,

  1. close the install wizard and open disk utility from the menu at the top left of the screen.
  2. make sure you select the correct drive (typically its the one with the largest available storage)
  3. format it
  4. re-launch the install wizard and the drive should show up
 
#8
If you ended up here because you are installing OS X after having some flavor of Linux/Unix/whatever the f*** installed, and you know your hard drive is good...

Make sure you reformat the drive (after exporting s*** you want to an external drive) to OS X (journaled) using the disk utility application.

If you don't know how to get to Disk Utility from the fresh install wizard,

  1. close the install wizard and open disk utility from the menu at the top left of the screen.
  2. make sure you select the correct drive (typically its the one with the largest available storage)
  3. format it
  4. re-launch the install wizard and the drive should show up
I'm just hoping that @Zeltron returns to fix the messed up steps. Looks like he did not actually try those steps, as most would be confusing to a new user.
As much as I dislike being pedantic :D -- here's some of those missteps
In a "fresh install" where you erase the internal boot drive, using Disk Utility, the internal drive would usually be the top item in the list. PROBABLY the largest, but not necessarily. That might be different if you have a large external drive attached, for example.
Apple usually does NOT use the name "wizard", and erasing the drive is generally synonymous with format, but Apple doesn't use "format" as an action. You would look for "Erase"
The format that you would choose, when erasing, would typically be Mac OS Extended (Journaled)
Disk Utility is NOT in a menu at the top left of the screen, but if you are booted to the macOS installer, will be on the Utilities window.

@Zeltron - If you are going to offer a method for completing a task, it's a good plan to try out your own steps first, just to see if someone else could make them out without doing a lot of guesswork.
 

Satcomer

In Geostationary Orbit
#12
Macs are great and Mac users are the best and most sofisticated and tolerant... But why do 99.9% of us have to he as DUMB as @Zeltron ?

I'm with @DeltaMac . If you really know what you're doing @Zeltron you should switch to Linux and stay off the Mac forums.
We should take your information from a person whom has a name Mac Suck! This kind of crap died of when Sever 2012 came out to have Macs and Linux official support!
 
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